SAN GABRIEL VALLEY TRANSIT FEASIBILITY STUDY | RESOURCES

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PROJECT DOCUMENTS & USEFUL LINKS

 

Below are some helpful links with more information to download, print and share. Looking for additional info? Please fill out the contact form here and let us know what you are looking for!

PROJECT DOCUMENTS & USEFUL LINKS

 

Below are some helpful links with more information to download, print and share. Looking for additional info? Please fill out the contact form here and let us know what you are looking for!

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
WHAT IS A FEASIBILITY STUDY?
A feasibility study is conducted in the early, pre-conceptual phase of project development. The Study considers a broad range of issues such as community mobility needs, obstacles to accessing public transit, land uses and constraints, and other opportunities and challenges for developing new transportation infrastructure. Key stakeholders and the public alike will have opportunities to weigh in during this preliminary project phase, to communicate their needs and preferences.
WHEN WILL THE STUDY BE COMPLETED, AND WHAT IS THE EXPECTED OUTCOME?
The feasibility study for this project is expected to be completed in 2022. The Study will evaluate options for short-term alternatives that can be developed within 15 years, as well as long-term visionary solutions that can be developed in up to 30 years, depending upon availability of funding.
THIRTY YEARS IS A LONG TIME. HOW CAN MOBILITY BE IMPROVED IN THE NEAR TERM?
The feasibility study will identify both short- and long-term project alternatives needed to meet the San Gabriel Valley’s evolving transportation needs—analyzing the most feasible and appropriate options for high-quality transit improvements. Short-term options may include reliable all-day transit service on lines that currently only run during peak commute periods, contingent on operating funds. Recognizing that many trips are made within the San Gabriel Valley, other near-term project alternatives may include developing better north/south connections to the existing east/west corridor served by Metro, Metrolink and Foothill Transit. Further short-term solutions may include the introduction of new Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) service that requires less intensive construction, or new Light Rail Transit (LRT) lines.
WHAT ARE THE NEXT STEPS IN THE PROCESS?

To identify both near-term and long-term solutions, the feasibility study will rely on public input and participation. Immediate first steps include surveys, discussions with stakeholders, and existing conditions analysis to identify areas of growth and constraints. The study will conclude with the ranking of the most viable and effective options with the intent to carry forward into project development a short-term project as well as to identify long-term, visionary improvements.

WHAT ARE THE FUTURE PROJECT PHASES?

For new infrastructure, future study phases could seek to further refine the intended route and identify the best transit technology based on such factors as funding, revenue forecast, commuter travel patterns and needs, and community impacts. The environmental study process will entail a robust community involvement effort to communicate details about the impacts of providing new transportation facilities, suggestions for mitigation and to learn about the public’s concerns. As with any project, several variations of the alternative, including a no-build alternative, will be studied to evaluate how to best improve mobility with the least negative impact. The environmental review process would be followed by a construction timeline that varies depending upon the funding schedule. For more information about Metro’s environmental review process, please visit:  www.metro.net/environmental-review/.

WHAT IS THE FUNDING FOR THIS PROJECT?

Metro has identified $635.5 million of local transportation funds starting in fiscal year 2022 for a near-term (15 years) transit capital improvement project, with additional funding for long-term options (2053), subject to funding availability.

WHAT IS THE HISTORY OF THIS STUDY?

The San Gabriel Valley Transit Feasibility Study was initiated following the Metro Board decision in February 2020 to withdraw the State Route (SR) 60 alternative in the Eastside Transit Corridor Phase 2 project to extend the Metro L Line (Gold). Recognizing that the corridor communities are committed to high-quality transit solutions and that the Study area is lacking in transit access – with many communities reliant on public transit to access jobs, schools, healthcare, and recreational facilities – Metro has partnered with the San Gabriel Valley Council of Governments to conduct a feasibility study to identify potential project alternatives to best serve these areas.

WHICH CITIES ARE INCLUDED IN THE TRANSIT STUDY AREA?

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The Study area includes all 31 cities and the unincorporated communities within the San Gabriel Valley Council of Governments service area:

 

Alhambra, Arcadia, Avocado Heights, Azusa, Baldwin Park, Bradbury, Claremont, Covina, Diamond Bar, Duarte, El Monte, Glendora, Hacienda Heights, Industry, Irwindale, La Canada Flintridge, La Puente, La Verne, Monrovia, Montebello, Monterey Park, Pasadena, Pomona, Roland Heights, Rosemead, San Dimas, San Gabriel, San Marino, Sierra Madre, South El Monte, South Pasadena, Temple City, Walnut and West Covina.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE TWO DIFFERENT FOCUS AREAS?
The Focus Area for Integration of Services leverages existing assets such as the Metro L Line (Gold) to integrate with connecting services. The Focus Area for New Services targets areas that may be currently underserved and lacking high-quality frequent transit service. While Metrolink and the J Line do serve this area, these services are mostly aimed at commuters traveling to and from Downtown L.A. at peak times during the week, and does not support many local trips, particularly north-south trips.
HOW IS THIS STUDY GOING TO BENEFIT VULNERABLE COMMUNITIES?
The SGV is home to several equity focus communities (EFCs), minority households, low-income households, and zero-vehicle households. These communities have a history of disinvestment, relying on transit as a primary mode of travel, including minors (persons under 18 years of age) and seniors (65 and older). Areas with high concentrations of transit-dependent populations and EFCs should be focus areas for new and improved service.
HOW CAN I PROVIDE INPUT?
Please visit our Community Input page to take a survey and tell us about your mobility patterns and needs. In early 2022, we will be holding a community open house to present some initial options and get your feedback. Please sign up for our mailing list towards the end of this webpage to stay informed about upcoming events and other opportunities to provide input!